[Guide] Immunity maxxing - How to boost your immunity and become a superhuman

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WOMEN ARE ATTRACTED TO MEN WITH STRONG IMMUNE SYSTEMS

A study published in the scientific journal Nature Communications has confirmed that men with strong, healthy immune systems, (and the physical qualities inherent therein), are typically deemed more attractive by members of the opposite sex.

The study, conducted at Scotland's Abertay University, concluded that classically attractive masculine traits — facial hair, a strong jaw, and toned body — develop in conjunction with healthy testosterone levels, “due to the sex hormone's immunosuppressive action,” as written by the final paper's authors.

This means that men who produce adequate levels of the hormone are less likely to get sick and more likely to have the physical traits that make rugged, manly men types like Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Russell Crowe perpetually popular.

Researchers found positive relationships between testosterone levels, facial attractiveness, and immune function in men. This research was done by injecting 74 Latvian men, all in their early 20s, with a shot of hepatitis B, which compromised the good health of the immune system.

Each man provided a blood sample immediately before the shot, and then again a month later. The men were each photographed, and the photographs were shown to 94 Latvian women of the same age group. These women were asked to judge each man's hotness on a scale of one to 10. Hotness ratings were then matched to each man's particular testosterone level and immune response.

Facial hair was linked with testosterone levels. Please make your own conclusions about this duo.
The study found that men perceived as weak were less attractive and that high testosterone levels correlated with strong immune system responses and attractive facial features.

Researchers also found a link between testosterone, the immune system, and the stress hormone cortisol. The connect here is that men with greater levels of cortisol (stress), have less healthy immune systems and lower testosterone levels, thus making them less attractive. Stress has long been known to compromise the immune system and manifest in flu, heart disease, thinning hair, teeth grinding, shortness of breath, and a bevy of other decidedly unsexy symptoms.

The conclusion is pretty clear here: on a level of basic biology, women want to mate with a strong, healthy provider-man who can assist in the production of strong, healthy babies. What's significant is that women can detect such levels with the naked eye.


1596238508559.png



How to boost your immune system

Helpful ways to strengthen your immune system and fight off disease

How can you improve your immune system? On the whole, your immune system does a remarkable job of defending you against disease-causing microorganisms. But sometimes it fails: A germ invades successfully and makes you sick. Is it possible to intervene in this process and boost your immune system? What if you improve your diet? Take certain vitamins or herbal preparations? Make other lifestyle changes in the hope of producing a near-perfect immune response?


What can you do to boost your immune system?

The idea of boosting your immunity is enticing, but the ability to do so has proved elusive for several reasons. The immune system is precisely that — a system, not a single entity. To function well, it requires balance and harmony. There is still much that researchers don't know about the intricacies and interconnectedness of the immune response. For now, there are no scientifically proven direct links between lifestyle and enhanced immune function.

But that doesn't mean the effects of lifestyle on the immune system aren't intriguing and shouldn't be studied. Researchers are exploring the effects of diet, exercise, age, psychological stress, and other factors on the immune response, both in animals and in humans. In the meantime, general healthy-living strategies are a good way to start giving your immune system the upper hand.


Immunity in action

Immunity in action. A healthy immune system can defeat invading pathogens as shown above, where two bacteria that cause gonorrhea are no match for the large phagocyte, called a neutrophil, that engulfs and kills them (see arrows).



Healthy ways to strengthen your immune system

Your first line of defense is to choose a healthy lifestyle. Following general good-health guidelines is the single best step you can take toward naturally keeping your immune system strong and healthy. Every part of your body, including your immune system, functions better when protected from environmental assaults and bolstered by healthy-living strategies such as these:

  • Don't smoke.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Try to minimize stress.
Increase immunity the healthy way

Many products on store shelves claim to boost or support immunity. But the concept of boosting immunity actually makes little sense scientifically. In fact, boosting the number of cells in your body — immune cells or others — is not necessarily a good thing. For example, athletes who engage in "blood doping" — pumping blood into their systems to boost their number of blood cells and enhance their performance — run the risk of strokes.

Attempting to boost the cells of your immune system is especially complicated because there are so many different kinds of cells in the immune system that respond to so many different microbes in so many ways. Which cells should you boost, and to what number? So far, scientists do not know the answer. What is known is that the body is continually generating immune cells. Certainly, it produces many more lymphocytes than it can possibly use. The extra cells remove themselves through a natural process of cell death called apoptosis — some before they see any action, some after the battle is won. No one knows how many cells or what the best mix of cells the immune system needs to function at its optimum level.



Immune system and age

As we age, our immune response capability becomes reduced, which in turn contributes to more infections and more cancer. As life expectancy in developed countries has increased, so too has the incidence of age-related conditions.

While some people age healthily, the conclusion of many studies is that, compared with younger people, the elderly are more likely to contract infectious diseases and, even more importantly, more likely to die from them. Respiratory infections, influenza, the COVID-19 virus, and particularly pneumonia are a leading cause of death in people over 65 worldwide. No one knows for sure why this happens, but some scientists observe that this increased risk correlates with a decrease in T cells, possibly from the thymus atrophying with age and producing fewer T cells to fight off infection. Whether this decrease in thymus function explains the drop in T cells or whether other changes play a role is not fully understood. Others are interested in whether the bone marrow becomes less efficient at producing the stem cells that give rise to the cells of the immune system.

A reduction in the immune response to infections has been demonstrated by older people's response to vaccines. For example, studies of influenza vaccines have shown that for people over age 65, the vaccine is less effective compared to healthy children (over age 2). But despite the reduction in efficacy, vaccinations for influenza and S. pneumoniae have significantly lowered the rates of sickness and death in older people when compared with no vaccination.


There appears to be a connection between nutrition and immunity in the elderly. A form of malnutrition that is surprisingly common even in affluent countries is known as "micronutrient malnutrition." Micronutrient malnutrition, in which a person is deficient in some essential vitamins and trace minerals that are obtained from or supplemented by diet, can happen in the elderly. Older people tend to eat less and often have less variety in their diets. One important question is whether dietary supplements may help older people maintain a healthier immune system. Older people should discuss this question with their doctor.




Diet and your immune system

Like any fighting force, the immune system army marches on its stomach. Healthy immune system warriors need good, regular nourishment. Scientists have long recognized that people who live in poverty and are malnourished are more vulnerable to infectious diseases. Whether the increased rate of disease is caused by malnutrition's effect on the immune system, however, is not certain. There are still relatively few studies on the effects of nutrition on the immune system of humans.

There is some evidence that various micronutrient deficiencies — for example, deficiencies of zinc, selenium, iron, copper, folic acid, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E — alter immune responses in animals, as measured in the test tube. However, the impact of these immune system changes on the health of animals is less clear, and the effect of similar deficiencies on the human immune response has yet to be assessed.

So, what can you do? If you suspect your diet is not providing you with all your micronutrient needs — may be, for instance, you don't like vegetables — taking a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement may bring other health benefits, beyond any possibly beneficial effects on the immune system. Taking megadoses of a single vitamin does not. More is not necessarily better.


Improve immunity with herbs and supplements?

Walk into a store, and you will find bottles of pills and herbal preparations that claim to "support immunity" or otherwise boost the health of your immune system. Although some preparations have been found to alter some components of immune function, thus far there is no evidence that they actually bolster immunity to the point where you are better protected against infection and disease. Demonstrating whether an herb — or any substance, for that matter — can enhance immunity is, as yet, a highly complicated matter. Scientists don't know, for example, whether an herb that seems to raise the levels of antibodies in the blood is actually doing anything beneficial for overall immunity.


Stress and immune function

Modern medicine has come to appreciate the closely linked relationship between mind and body. A wide variety of maladies, including stomach upset, hives, and even heart disease, are linked to the effects of emotional stress. Despite the challenges, scientists are actively studying the relationship between stress and immune function.

For one thing, stress is difficult to define. What may appear to be a stressful situation for one person is not for another. When people are exposed to situations they regard as stressful, it is difficult for them to measure how much stress they feel, and difficult for the scientist to know if a person's subjective impression of the amount of stress is accurate. The scientist can only measure things that may reflect stress, such as the number of times the heart beats each minute, but such measures also may reflect other factors.

Most scientists studying the relationship of stress and immune function, however, do not study a sudden, short-lived stressor; rather, they try to study more constant and frequent stressors known as chronic stress, such as that caused by relationships with family, friends, and co-workers, or sustained challenges to perform well at one's work. Some scientists are investigating whether ongoing stress takes a toll on the immune system.

But it is hard to perform what scientists call "controlled experiments" in human beings. In a controlled experiment, the scientist can change one and only one factor, such as the amount of a particular chemical, and then measure the effect of that change on some other measurable phenomenon, such as the number of antibodies produced by a particular type of immune system cell when it is exposed to the chemical. In a living animal, and especially in a human being, that kind of control is just not possible, since there are so many other things happening to the animal or person at the time that measurements are being taken.


Despite these inevitable difficulties in measuring the relationship of stress to immunity, scientists are making progress.


Does being cold give you a weak immune system?

Almost every mother has said it: "Wear a jacket or you'll catch a cold!" Is she right? Probably not, exposure to moderately cold temperatures doesn't increase your susceptibility to infection. There are two reasons why winter is "cold and flu season." In the winter, people spend more time indoors, in closer contact with other people who can pass on their germs. Also, the influenza virus stays airborne longer when air is cold and less humid.

But researchers remain interested in this question in different populations. Some experiments with mice suggest that cold exposure might reduce the ability to cope with infection. But what about humans? Scientists have dunked people in cold water and made others sit nude in subfreezing temperatures. They've studied people who lived in Antarctica and those on expeditions in the Canadian Rockies. The results have been mixed. For example, researchers documented an increase in upper respiratory infections in competitive cross-country skiers who exercise vigorously in the cold, but whether these infections are due to the cold or other factors — such as the intense exercise or the dryness of the air — is not known.

A group of Canadian researchers that has reviewed hundreds of medical studies on the subject and conducted some of its own research concludes that there's no need to worry about moderate cold exposure — it has no detrimental effect on the human immune system. Should you bundle up when it's cold outside? The answer is "yes" if you're uncomfortable, or if you're going to be outdoors for an extended period where such problems as frostbite and hypothermia are a risk. But don't worry about immunity.


Exercise: Good or bad for immunity?

Regular exercise is one of the pillars of healthy living. It improves cardiovascular health, lowers blood pressure, helps control body weight, and protects against a variety of diseases. But does it help to boost your immune system naturally and keep it healthy? Just like a healthy diet, exercise can contribute to general good health and therefore to a healthy immune system. It may contribute even more directly by promoting good circulation, which allows the cells and substances of the immune system to move through the body freely and do their job efficiently.





SUPPLEMENTS






1596239844306.png


GARLIC


Why you should take it

Garlic is a vegetable, traditionally supplemented for its ability to enhance the immune system.

Garlic can improve the ability of white blood cells to destroy invaders, in a process called phagocytosis. It also increases the production of T-cells, another one of the body’s defenses.

Due to these two properties, garlic can reduce the risk of infections and the common cold by as much as 60%. Keep in mind, garlic supplementation will not reduce the severity of symptoms or the duration of illness. It is a preventative supplement.

Garlic may interact with several medications, including pharmaceuticals used to treat tuberculosis and HIV. It can also decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Talk to your doctor about garlic supplementation if you are taking medication, particularly blood thinners like warfarin.



How to take it


Garlic can be supplemented or eaten as a food product. Both methods are effective. People that do not like garlic’s taste or smell are recommended to supplement garlic instead of eating it.

Three cloves of garlic, eaten with meals throughout the day, will provide maximum benefits. Garlic can be eaten straight or used in cooking. Garlic must be crushed or cut before it is heated to release the bioactive compounds.

To supplement garlic, take 600 – 1,200 mg of aged garlic extract, split into multiple doses, and taken with meals. Aging garlic preserves its benefits while eliminating the scent.




1596239256918.png


VITAMIN C


Why you should take it

Vitamin C can reduce the duration of illness and the frequency of the common cold if supplemented by very physically active people.


When taken as a daily preventative, vitamin C can ward off the common cold. Taking high doses of vitamin C at the beginning of an illness will not reduce the severity of symptoms.

Active people are the most likely to benefit from vitamin C’s ability to reduce illness frequency. If you do not regularly exercise, vitamin C supplementation will not prevent you from getting sick.

Vitamin C has the most research done on it in the context of alleviating upper respiratory tract infections, like the common cold.

Like garlic, vitamin C may reduce the effectiveness of some HIV medications. Vitamin C should be supplemented several hours after aluminum-based antacids because it can increase the absorption of iron and aluminum.


How to take it

To supplement vitamin C, take 1,000 – 2,000 mg, in divided doses throughout the day. Further research is needed to determine if vitamin C is more effective when taken with a meal.













 
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abmonger

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WOMEN ARE ATTRACTED TO MEN WITH STRONG IMMUNE SYSTEMS

A study published in the scientific journal Nature Communications has confirmed that men with strong, healthy immune systems, (and the physical qualities inherent therein), are typically deemed more attractive by members of the opposite sex.

The study, conducted at Scotland's Abertay University, concluded that classically attractive masculine traits — facial hair, a strong jaw, and toned body — develop in conjunction with healthy testosterone levels, “due to the sex hormone's immunosuppressive action,” as written by the final paper's authors.

This means that men who produce adequate levels of the hormone are less likely to get sick and more likely to have the physical traits that make rugged, manly men types like Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Russell Crowe perpetually popular.

Researchers found positive relationships between testosterone levels, facial attractiveness, and immune function in men. This research was done by injecting 74 Latvian men, all in their early 20s, with a shot of hepatitis B, which compromised the good health of the immune system.

Each man provided a blood sample immediately before the shot, and then again a month later. The men were each photographed, and the photographs were shown to 94 Latvian women of the same age group. These women were asked to judge each man's hotness on a scale of one to 10. Hotness ratings were then matched to each man's particular testosterone level and immune response.

Facial hair was linked with testosterone levels. Please make your own conclusions about this duo.
The study found that men perceived as weak were less attractive and that high testosterone levels correlated with strong immune system responses and attractive facial features.

Researchers also found a link between testosterone, the immune system, and the stress hormone cortisol. The connect here is that men with greater levels of cortisol (stress), have less healthy immune systems and lower testosterone levels, thus making them less attractive. Stress has long been known to compromise the immune system and manifest in flu, heart disease, thinning hair, teeth grinding, shortness of breath, and a bevy of other decidedly unsexy symptoms.

The conclusion is pretty clear here: on a level of basic biology, women want to mate with a strong, healthy provider-man who can assist in the production of strong, healthy babies. What's significant is that women can detect such levels with the naked eye.


View attachment 558443


How to boost your immune system

Helpful ways to strengthen your immune system and fight off disease

How can you improve your immune system? On the whole, your immune system does a remarkable job of defending you against disease-causing microorganisms. But sometimes it fails: A germ invades successfully and makes you sick. Is it possible to intervene in this process and boost your immune system? What if you improve your diet? Take certain vitamins or herbal preparations? Make other lifestyle changes in the hope of producing a near-perfect immune response?


What can you do to boost your immune system?

The idea of boosting your immunity is enticing, but the ability to do so has proved elusive for several reasons. The immune system is precisely that — a system, not a single entity. To function well, it requires balance and harmony. There is still much that researchers don't know about the intricacies and interconnectedness of the immune response. For now, there are no scientifically proven direct links between lifestyle and enhanced immune function.

But that doesn't mean the effects of lifestyle on the immune system aren't intriguing and shouldn't be studied. Researchers are exploring the effects of diet, exercise, age, psychological stress, and other factors on the immune response, both in animals and in humans. In the meantime, general healthy-living strategies are a good way to start giving your immune system the upper hand.


Immunity in action

Immunity in action. A healthy immune system can defeat invading pathogens as shown above, where two bacteria that cause gonorrhea are no match for the large phagocyte, called a neutrophil, that engulfs and kills them (see arrows).



Healthy ways to strengthen your immune system

Your first line of defense is to choose a healthy lifestyle. Following general good-health guidelines is the single best step you can take toward naturally keeping your immune system strong and healthy. Every part of your body, including your immune system, functions better when protected from environmental assaults and bolstered by healthy-living strategies such as these:

  • Don't smoke.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Try to minimize stress.
Increase immunity the healthy way

Many products on store shelves claim to boost or support immunity. But the concept of boosting immunity actually makes little sense scientifically. In fact, boosting the number of cells in your body — immune cells or others — is not necessarily a good thing. For example, athletes who engage in "blood doping" — pumping blood into their systems to boost their number of blood cells and enhance their performance — run the risk of strokes.

Attempting to boost the cells of your immune system is especially complicated because there are so many different kinds of cells in the immune system that respond to so many different microbes in so many ways. Which cells should you boost, and to what number? So far, scientists do not know the answer. What is known is that the body is continually generating immune cells. Certainly, it produces many more lymphocytes than it can possibly use. The extra cells remove themselves through a natural process of cell death called apoptosis — some before they see any action, some after the battle is won. No one knows how many cells or what the best mix of cells the immune system needs to function at its optimum level.



Immune system and age

As we age, our immune response capability becomes reduced, which in turn contributes to more infections and more cancer. As life expectancy in developed countries has increased, so too has the incidence of age-related conditions.

While some people age healthily, the conclusion of many studies is that, compared with younger people, the elderly are more likely to contract infectious diseases and, even more importantly, more likely to die from them. Respiratory infections, influenza, the COVID-19 virus, and particularly pneumonia are a leading cause of death in people over 65 worldwide. No one knows for sure why this happens, but some scientists observe that this increased risk correlates with a decrease in T cells, possibly from the thymus atrophying with age and producing fewer T cells to fight off infection. Whether this decrease in thymus function explains the drop in T cells or whether other changes play a role is not fully understood. Others are interested in whether the bone marrow becomes less efficient at producing the stem cells that give rise to the cells of the immune system.

A reduction in the immune response to infections has been demonstrated by older people's response to vaccines. For example, studies of influenza vaccines have shown that for people over age 65, the vaccine is less effective compared to healthy children (over age 2). But despite the reduction in efficacy, vaccinations for influenza and S. pneumoniae have significantly lowered the rates of sickness and death in older people when compared with no vaccination.


There appears to be a connection between nutrition and immunity in the elderly. A form of malnutrition that is surprisingly common even in affluent countries is known as "micronutrient malnutrition." Micronutrient malnutrition, in which a person is deficient in some essential vitamins and trace minerals that are obtained from or supplemented by diet, can happen in the elderly. Older people tend to eat less and often have less variety in their diets. One important question is whether dietary supplements may help older people maintain a healthier immune system. Older people should discuss this question with their doctor.




Diet and your immune system

Like any fighting force, the immune system army marches on its stomach. Healthy immune system warriors need good, regular nourishment. Scientists have long recognized that people who live in poverty and are malnourished are more vulnerable to infectious diseases. Whether the increased rate of disease is caused by malnutrition's effect on the immune system, however, is not certain. There are still relatively few studies on the effects of nutrition on the immune system of humans.

There is some evidence that various micronutrient deficiencies — for example, deficiencies of zinc, selenium, iron, copper, folic acid, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E — alter immune responses in animals, as measured in the test tube. However, the impact of these immune system changes on the health of animals is less clear, and the effect of similar deficiencies on the human immune response has yet to be assessed.

So, what can you do? If you suspect your diet is not providing you with all your micronutrient needs — may be, for instance, you don't like vegetables — taking a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement may bring other health benefits, beyond any possibly beneficial effects on the immune system. Taking megadoses of a single vitamin does not. More is not necessarily better.


Improve immunity with herbs and supplements?

Walk into a store, and you will find bottles of pills and herbal preparations that claim to "support immunity" or otherwise boost the health of your immune system. Although some preparations have been found to alter some components of immune function, thus far there is no evidence that they actually bolster immunity to the point where you are better protected against infection and disease. Demonstrating whether an herb — or any substance, for that matter — can enhance immunity is, as yet, a highly complicated matter. Scientists don't know, for example, whether an herb that seems to raise the levels of antibodies in the blood is actually doing anything beneficial for overall immunity.


Stress and immune function

Modern medicine has come to appreciate the closely linked relationship between mind and body. A wide variety of maladies, including stomach upset, hives, and even heart disease, are linked to the effects of emotional stress. Despite the challenges, scientists are actively studying the relationship between stress and immune function.

For one thing, stress is difficult to define. What may appear to be a stressful situation for one person is not for another. When people are exposed to situations they regard as stressful, it is difficult for them to measure how much stress they feel, and difficult for the scientist to know if a person's subjective impression of the amount of stress is accurate. The scientist can only measure things that may reflect stress, such as the number of times the heart beats each minute, but such measures also may reflect other factors.

Most scientists studying the relationship of stress and immune function, however, do not study a sudden, short-lived stressor; rather, they try to study more constant and frequent stressors known as chronic stress, such as that caused by relationships with family, friends, and co-workers, or sustained challenges to perform well at one's work. Some scientists are investigating whether ongoing stress takes a toll on the immune system.

But it is hard to perform what scientists call "controlled experiments" in human beings. In a controlled experiment, the scientist can change one and only one factor, such as the amount of a particular chemical, and then measure the effect of that change on some other measurable phenomenon, such as the number of antibodies produced by a particular type of immune system cell when it is exposed to the chemical. In a living animal, and especially in a human being, that kind of control is just not possible, since there are so many other things happening to the animal or person at the time that measurements are being taken.


Despite these inevitable difficulties in measuring the relationship of stress to immunity, scientists are making progress.


Does being cold give you a weak immune system?

Almost every mother has said it: "Wear a jacket or you'll catch a cold!" Is she right? Probably not, exposure to moderately cold temperatures doesn't increase your susceptibility to infection. There are two reasons why winter is "cold and flu season." In the winter, people spend more time indoors, in closer contact with other people who can pass on their germs. Also, the influenza virus stays airborne longer when air is cold and less humid.

But researchers remain interested in this question in different populations. Some experiments with mice suggest that cold exposure might reduce the ability to cope with infection. But what about humans? Scientists have dunked people in cold water and made others sit nude in subfreezing temperatures. They've studied people who lived in Antarctica and those on expeditions in the Canadian Rockies. The results have been mixed. For example, researchers documented an increase in upper respiratory infections in competitive cross-country skiers who exercise vigorously in the cold, but whether these infections are due to the cold or other factors — such as the intense exercise or the dryness of the air — is not known.

A group of Canadian researchers that has reviewed hundreds of medical studies on the subject and conducted some of its own research concludes that there's no need to worry about moderate cold exposure — it has no detrimental effect on the human immune system. Should you bundle up when it's cold outside? The answer is "yes" if you're uncomfortable, or if you're going to be outdoors for an extended period where such problems as frostbite and hypothermia are a risk. But don't worry about immunity.


Exercise: Good or bad for immunity?

Regular exercise is one of the pillars of healthy living. It improves cardiovascular health, lowers blood pressure, helps control body weight, and protects against a variety of diseases. But does it help to boost your immune system naturally and keep it healthy? Just like a healthy diet, exercise can contribute to general good health and therefore to a healthy immune system. It may contribute even more directly by promoting good circulation, which allows the cells and substances of the immune system to move through the body freely and do their job efficiently.





SUPPLEMENTS







View attachment 558474

GARLIC


Why you should take it

Garlic is a vegetable, traditionally supplemented for its ability to enhance the immune system.

Garlic can improve the ability of white blood cells to destroy invaders, in a process called phagocytosis. It also increases the production of T-cells, another one of the body’s defenses.

Due to these two properties, garlic can reduce the risk of infections and the common cold by as much as 60%. Keep in mind, garlic supplementation will not reduce the severity of symptoms or the duration of illness. It is a preventative supplement.

Garlic may interact with several medications, including pharmaceuticals used to treat tuberculosis and HIV. It can also decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Talk to your doctor about garlic supplementation if you are taking medication, particularly blood thinners like warfarin.



How to take it


Garlic can be supplemented or eaten as a food product. Both methods are effective. People that do not like garlic’s taste or smell are recommended to supplement garlic instead of eating it.

Three cloves of garlic, eaten with meals throughout the day, will provide maximum benefits. Garlic can be eaten straight or used in cooking. Garlic must be crushed or cut before it is heated to release the bioactive compounds.

To supplement garlic, take 600 – 1,200 mg of aged garlic extract, split into multiple doses, and taken with meals. Aging garlic preserves its benefits while eliminating the scent.




View attachment 558473

VITAMIN C


Why you should take it

Vitamin C can reduce the duration of illness and the frequency of the common cold if supplemented by very physically active people.


When taken as a daily preventative, vitamin C can ward off the common cold. Taking high doses of vitamin C at the beginning of an illness will not reduce the severity of symptoms.

Active people are the most likely to benefit from vitamin C’s ability to reduce illness frequency. If you do not regularly exercise, vitamin C supplementation will not prevent you from getting sick.

Vitamin C has the most research done on it in the context of alleviating upper respiratory tract infections, like the common cold.

Like garlic, vitamin C may reduce the effectiveness of some HIV medications. Vitamin C should be supplemented several hours after aluminum-based antacids because it can increase the absorption of iron and aluminum.


How to take it

To supplement vitamin C, take 1,000 – 2,000 mg, in divided doses throughout the day. Further research is needed to determine if vitamin C is more effective when taken with a meal.






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holy shit you need to get banned
 
recessed

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great thread
 
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JamesHowlett

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I immune system mog this forum

I’m 25 and last time I threw up was when I was 6
 
Morgothos

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Deathrasher42

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Bro imma just find this kid and behead him Brazilian style
 
The Bleach Pill

The Bleach Pill

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copy and pasted lol
spreading a whole bunch of shit you jew
 
MadVisionary

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Good thread
 
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JustBeCurry

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overdose on estrogen water asap, fuck my immunity natural and free rope
 
Simone Nobili

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copy and pasted lol
spreading a whole bunch of shit you jew
Holy fuck @Jew
You really are a jew
 
DutchPrettyBoy

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crosshold

crosshold

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i appreciate the effort but im not reading that
 
Copemaxxing

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Cant remember last time I was sick. Is that a good singn?
 
alexjones

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interesting stuff nevertheless
 
BigBoy

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Why tf do u make the text an unreadable color
 
theREALbleachcel

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arianaisawesome

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People reading this, you kinda also wanna do some research for yourselves. He makes great points though. With stuff like vitamin C supplements, you have to be careful because having too much of it might have some link with kidney stones. Some study's are for it, some are against it so I'm not 100% sure. Just a risk you should be knowledgable on
 
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MisterMercedes

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What a joke. Women won’t get turned on by the fact that you rarely get sick. They get turned on by your physical features, which are often related to/sign of a healthy immune system.

It’s like saying good grades are often a sign of high intellect, so just show your teacher your IQ score to get a 100.
 
Cope

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Cringe and bluepilled
 
James97

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let my boy get 100 rep
 
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Pussyslayer

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Nigga you mass tagged everyone then deleted it
 
intovoid

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It’s over for 90% of curries
 
ThisLifeKillsMe

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Matias0209

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WOMEN ARE ATTRACTED TO MEN WITH STRONG IMMUNE SYSTEMS

A study published in the scientific journal Nature Communications has confirmed that men with strong, healthy immune systems, (and the physical qualities inherent therein), are typically deemed more attractive by members of the opposite sex.

The study, conducted at Scotland's Abertay University, concluded that classically attractive masculine traits — facial hair, a strong jaw, and toned body — develop in conjunction with healthy testosterone levels, “due to the sex hormone's immunosuppressive action,” as written by the final paper's authors.

This means that men who produce adequate levels of the hormone are less likely to get sick and more likely to have the physical traits that make rugged, manly men types like Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Russell Crowe perpetually popular.

Researchers found positive relationships between testosterone levels, facial attractiveness, and immune function in men. This research was done by injecting 74 Latvian men, all in their early 20s, with a shot of hepatitis B, which compromised the good health of the immune system.

Each man provided a blood sample immediately before the shot, and then again a month later. The men were each photographed, and the photographs were shown to 94 Latvian women of the same age group. These women were asked to judge each man's hotness on a scale of one to 10. Hotness ratings were then matched to each man's particular testosterone level and immune response.

Facial hair was linked with testosterone levels. Please make your own conclusions about this duo.
The study found that men perceived as weak were less attractive and that high testosterone levels correlated with strong immune system responses and attractive facial features.

Researchers also found a link between testosterone, the immune system, and the stress hormone cortisol. The connect here is that men with greater levels of cortisol (stress), have less healthy immune systems and lower testosterone levels, thus making them less attractive. Stress has long been known to compromise the immune system and manifest in flu, heart disease, thinning hair, teeth grinding, shortness of breath, and a bevy of other decidedly unsexy symptoms.

The conclusion is pretty clear here: on a level of basic biology, women want to mate with a strong, healthy provider-man who can assist in the production of strong, healthy babies. What's significant is that women can detect such levels with the naked eye.


View attachment 558443


How to boost your immune system

Helpful ways to strengthen your immune system and fight off disease

How can you improve your immune system? On the whole, your immune system does a remarkable job of defending you against disease-causing microorganisms. But sometimes it fails: A germ invades successfully and makes you sick. Is it possible to intervene in this process and boost your immune system? What if you improve your diet? Take certain vitamins or herbal preparations? Make other lifestyle changes in the hope of producing a near-perfect immune response?


What can you do to boost your immune system?

The idea of boosting your immunity is enticing, but the ability to do so has proved elusive for several reasons. The immune system is precisely that — a system, not a single entity. To function well, it requires balance and harmony. There is still much that researchers don't know about the intricacies and interconnectedness of the immune response. For now, there are no scientifically proven direct links between lifestyle and enhanced immune function.

But that doesn't mean the effects of lifestyle on the immune system aren't intriguing and shouldn't be studied. Researchers are exploring the effects of diet, exercise, age, psychological stress, and other factors on the immune response, both in animals and in humans. In the meantime, general healthy-living strategies are a good way to start giving your immune system the upper hand.


Immunity in action

Immunity in action. A healthy immune system can defeat invading pathogens as shown above, where two bacteria that cause gonorrhea are no match for the large phagocyte, called a neutrophil, that engulfs and kills them (see arrows).



Healthy ways to strengthen your immune system

Your first line of defense is to choose a healthy lifestyle. Following general good-health guidelines is the single best step you can take toward naturally keeping your immune system strong and healthy. Every part of your body, including your immune system, functions better when protected from environmental assaults and bolstered by healthy-living strategies such as these:

  • Don't smoke.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Try to minimize stress.
Increase immunity the healthy way

Many products on store shelves claim to boost or support immunity. But the concept of boosting immunity actually makes little sense scientifically. In fact, boosting the number of cells in your body — immune cells or others — is not necessarily a good thing. For example, athletes who engage in "blood doping" — pumping blood into their systems to boost their number of blood cells and enhance their performance — run the risk of strokes.

Attempting to boost the cells of your immune system is especially complicated because there are so many different kinds of cells in the immune system that respond to so many different microbes in so many ways. Which cells should you boost, and to what number? So far, scientists do not know the answer. What is known is that the body is continually generating immune cells. Certainly, it produces many more lymphocytes than it can possibly use. The extra cells remove themselves through a natural process of cell death called apoptosis — some before they see any action, some after the battle is won. No one knows how many cells or what the best mix of cells the immune system needs to function at its optimum level.



Immune system and age

As we age, our immune response capability becomes reduced, which in turn contributes to more infections and more cancer. As life expectancy in developed countries has increased, so too has the incidence of age-related conditions.

While some people age healthily, the conclusion of many studies is that, compared with younger people, the elderly are more likely to contract infectious diseases and, even more importantly, more likely to die from them. Respiratory infections, influenza, the COVID-19 virus, and particularly pneumonia are a leading cause of death in people over 65 worldwide. No one knows for sure why this happens, but some scientists observe that this increased risk correlates with a decrease in T cells, possibly from the thymus atrophying with age and producing fewer T cells to fight off infection. Whether this decrease in thymus function explains the drop in T cells or whether other changes play a role is not fully understood. Others are interested in whether the bone marrow becomes less efficient at producing the stem cells that give rise to the cells of the immune system.

A reduction in the immune response to infections has been demonstrated by older people's response to vaccines. For example, studies of influenza vaccines have shown that for people over age 65, the vaccine is less effective compared to healthy children (over age 2). But despite the reduction in efficacy, vaccinations for influenza and S. pneumoniae have significantly lowered the rates of sickness and death in older people when compared with no vaccination.


There appears to be a connection between nutrition and immunity in the elderly. A form of malnutrition that is surprisingly common even in affluent countries is known as "micronutrient malnutrition." Micronutrient malnutrition, in which a person is deficient in some essential vitamins and trace minerals that are obtained from or supplemented by diet, can happen in the elderly. Older people tend to eat less and often have less variety in their diets. One important question is whether dietary supplements may help older people maintain a healthier immune system. Older people should discuss this question with their doctor.




Diet and your immune system

Like any fighting force, the immune system army marches on its stomach. Healthy immune system warriors need good, regular nourishment. Scientists have long recognized that people who live in poverty and are malnourished are more vulnerable to infectious diseases. Whether the increased rate of disease is caused by malnutrition's effect on the immune system, however, is not certain. There are still relatively few studies on the effects of nutrition on the immune system of humans.

There is some evidence that various micronutrient deficiencies — for example, deficiencies of zinc, selenium, iron, copper, folic acid, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E — alter immune responses in animals, as measured in the test tube. However, the impact of these immune system changes on the health of animals is less clear, and the effect of similar deficiencies on the human immune response has yet to be assessed.

So, what can you do? If you suspect your diet is not providing you with all your micronutrient needs — may be, for instance, you don't like vegetables — taking a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement may bring other health benefits, beyond any possibly beneficial effects on the immune system. Taking megadoses of a single vitamin does not. More is not necessarily better.


Improve immunity with herbs and supplements?

Walk into a store, and you will find bottles of pills and herbal preparations that claim to "support immunity" or otherwise boost the health of your immune system. Although some preparations have been found to alter some components of immune function, thus far there is no evidence that they actually bolster immunity to the point where you are better protected against infection and disease. Demonstrating whether an herb — or any substance, for that matter — can enhance immunity is, as yet, a highly complicated matter. Scientists don't know, for example, whether an herb that seems to raise the levels of antibodies in the blood is actually doing anything beneficial for overall immunity.


Stress and immune function

Modern medicine has come to appreciate the closely linked relationship between mind and body. A wide variety of maladies, including stomach upset, hives, and even heart disease, are linked to the effects of emotional stress. Despite the challenges, scientists are actively studying the relationship between stress and immune function.

For one thing, stress is difficult to define. What may appear to be a stressful situation for one person is not for another. When people are exposed to situations they regard as stressful, it is difficult for them to measure how much stress they feel, and difficult for the scientist to know if a person's subjective impression of the amount of stress is accurate. The scientist can only measure things that may reflect stress, such as the number of times the heart beats each minute, but such measures also may reflect other factors.

Most scientists studying the relationship of stress and immune function, however, do not study a sudden, short-lived stressor; rather, they try to study more constant and frequent stressors known as chronic stress, such as that caused by relationships with family, friends, and co-workers, or sustained challenges to perform well at one's work. Some scientists are investigating whether ongoing stress takes a toll on the immune system.

But it is hard to perform what scientists call "controlled experiments" in human beings. In a controlled experiment, the scientist can change one and only one factor, such as the amount of a particular chemical, and then measure the effect of that change on some other measurable phenomenon, such as the number of antibodies produced by a particular type of immune system cell when it is exposed to the chemical. In a living animal, and especially in a human being, that kind of control is just not possible, since there are so many other things happening to the animal or person at the time that measurements are being taken.


Despite these inevitable difficulties in measuring the relationship of stress to immunity, scientists are making progress.


Does being cold give you a weak immune system?

Almost every mother has said it: "Wear a jacket or you'll catch a cold!" Is she right? Probably not, exposure to moderately cold temperatures doesn't increase your susceptibility to infection. There are two reasons why winter is "cold and flu season." In the winter, people spend more time indoors, in closer contact with other people who can pass on their germs. Also, the influenza virus stays airborne longer when air is cold and less humid.

But researchers remain interested in this question in different populations. Some experiments with mice suggest that cold exposure might reduce the ability to cope with infection. But what about humans? Scientists have dunked people in cold water and made others sit nude in subfreezing temperatures. They've studied people who lived in Antarctica and those on expeditions in the Canadian Rockies. The results have been mixed. For example, researchers documented an increase in upper respiratory infections in competitive cross-country skiers who exercise vigorously in the cold, but whether these infections are due to the cold or other factors — such as the intense exercise or the dryness of the air — is not known.

A group of Canadian researchers that has reviewed hundreds of medical studies on the subject and conducted some of its own research concludes that there's no need to worry about moderate cold exposure — it has no detrimental effect on the human immune system. Should you bundle up when it's cold outside? The answer is "yes" if you're uncomfortable, or if you're going to be outdoors for an extended period where such problems as frostbite and hypothermia are a risk. But don't worry about immunity.


Exercise: Good or bad for immunity?

Regular exercise is one of the pillars of healthy living. It improves cardiovascular health, lowers blood pressure, helps control body weight, and protects against a variety of diseases. But does it help to boost your immune system naturally and keep it healthy? Just like a healthy diet, exercise can contribute to general good health and therefore to a healthy immune system. It may contribute even more directly by promoting good circulation, which allows the cells and substances of the immune system to move through the body freely and do their job efficiently.





SUPPLEMENTS






View attachment 558496

GARLIC


Why you should take it

Garlic is a vegetable, traditionally supplemented for its ability to enhance the immune system.

Garlic can improve the ability of white blood cells to destroy invaders, in a process called phagocytosis. It also increases the production of T-cells, another one of the body’s defenses.

Due to these two properties, garlic can reduce the risk of infections and the common cold by as much as 60%. Keep in mind, garlic supplementation will not reduce the severity of symptoms or the duration of illness. It is a preventative supplement.

Garlic may interact with several medications, including pharmaceuticals used to treat tuberculosis and HIV. It can also decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Talk to your doctor about garlic supplementation if you are taking medication, particularly blood thinners like warfarin.



How to take it


Garlic can be supplemented or eaten as a food product. Both methods are effective. People that do not like garlic’s taste or smell are recommended to supplement garlic instead of eating it.

Three cloves of garlic, eaten with meals throughout the day, will provide maximum benefits. Garlic can be eaten straight or used in cooking. Garlic must be crushed or cut before it is heated to release the bioactive compounds.

To supplement garlic, take 600 – 1,200 mg of aged garlic extract, split into multiple doses, and taken with meals. Aging garlic preserves its benefits while eliminating the scent.




View attachment 558473

VITAMIN C


Why you should take it

Vitamin C can reduce the duration of illness and the frequency of the common cold if supplemented by very physically active people.


When taken as a daily preventative, vitamin C can ward off the common cold. Taking high doses of vitamin C at the beginning of an illness will not reduce the severity of symptoms.

Active people are the most likely to benefit from vitamin C’s ability to reduce illness frequency. If you do not regularly exercise, vitamin C supplementation will not prevent you from getting sick.

Vitamin C has the most research done on it in the context of alleviating upper respiratory tract infections, like the common cold.

Like garlic, vitamin C may reduce the effectiveness of some HIV medications. Vitamin C should be supplemented several hours after aluminum-based antacids because it can increase the absorption of iron and aluminum.


How to take it

To supplement vitamin C, take 1,000 – 2,000 mg, in divided doses throughout the day. Further research is needed to determine if vitamin C is more effective when taken with a meal.













foid: OMG that inmune system is so hot😍
 
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TITUS

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Read nothing, you can't trust the jew.
 
Virgincel

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No immune system for your face
 
Good_Little_Goy

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It’s more complex than that, in terms of attraction typically humans mate with someone who has an ‘opposite’ immune system. Can’t really explain it better.


No immune system for your face
speak for your acne ridden self
 
Virgincel

Virgincel

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It’s more complex than that, in terms of attraction typically humans mate with someone who has an ‘opposite’ immune system. Can’t really explain it better.



speak for your acne ridden self
cope
 
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