Guide Supplements Megathread

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

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A couple of months ago I made a Thread about Base Supplements for Looksmaxxing. but it was a Half ass effort and was not accurate, this is the most accurate shit out there as all of the stuff is taken from Examine.com (The most legit place to know about Supplements).


Allergies and Immunity

• Garlic

Why you should take it
Garlic is a vegetable, traditionally supplemented for its ability to enhance the immune system.
Garlic can improve the ability of white blood cells to destroy invaders, in a process called phagocytosis. It also increases the production of T-cells, another one of the body’s defenses.
Due to these two properties, garlic can reduce the risk of infections and the common cold by as much as 60%. Keep in mind, garlic supplementation will not reduce the severity of symptoms or the duration of illness. It is a preventative supplement.
Garlic may interact with several medications, including pharmaceuticals used to treat tuberculosis and HIV. It can also decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Talk to your doctor about garlic supplementation if you are taking medication, particularly blood thinners like warfarin.

How to take it
Garlic can be supplemented or eaten as a food product. Both methods are effective. People that do not like garlic’s taste or smell are recommended to supplement garlic instead of eating it.
Three cloves of garlic, eaten with meals throughout the day, will provide maximum benefits. Garlic can be eaten straight or used in cooking. Garlic must be crushed or cut before it is heated to release the bioactive compounds.
To supplement garlic, take 600 – 1,200 mg of aged garlic extract, split into multiple doses, and taken with meals. Aging garlic preserves its benefits while eliminating the scent.

• Vitamin C

Why you should take it
Vitamin C can reduce the duration of illness and the frequency of the common cold if supplemented by very physically active people.
When taken as a daily preventative, vitamin C can ward off the common cold. Taking high doses of vitamin C at the beginning of an illness will not reduce the severity of symptoms.
Active people are the most likely to benefit from vitamin C’s ability to reduce illness frequency. If you do not regularly exercise, vitamin C supplementation will not prevent you from getting sick.
Vitamin C has the most research done on it in the context of alleviating upper respiratory tract infections, like the common cold.
Like garlic, vitamin C may reduce the effectiveness of some HIV medications. Vitamin C should be supplemented several hours after aluminium-based antacids because it can increase the absorption of iron and aluminium.

How to take it
To supplement vitamin C, take 1,000 – 2,000 mg, in divided doses throughout the day. Further research is needed to determine if vitamin C is more effective when taken with a meal.

Honorable Mentions:
• Pelargonium sidoides
• Tinospora cordifolia
• Spirulina
• Zinc

Copes:
• Echinacea



Cardiovascular & Heart Health

• Procyanidins

Why you should take it
Procyanidins are a class of supplements that share similar flavonoid structures. Procyanidin supplementation can improve blood flow and circulation.
Procyanidin supplementation can help maintain nitric oxide (NO) levels. Low NO levels can cause blood vessels to narrow, leading to reduced blood flow. This makes procyanidins a good preventative supplement for high
blood pressure. It can also alleviate high blood pressure caused by low NO levels. Keep in mind, not all cases of hypertension, or high blood pressure, are related to NO.
Procyanidins include the polyphenols in cocoa, grape seed extract, and
the brand name product Pycnogenol, also known as pine bark extract. Pycnogenol is the most well researched procyanidin source, though it is also the most expensive. Grape seed extract is a similar compound. It has less evidence for its effects but is also less expensive. Cocoa has a different set of procyanidins but provides similar benefits.

How to take it
The standard procyanidin dosage depends on the form of supplementation.
To supplement Pycnogenol, take 100 – 200 mg a day. Doses as low as 40 – 60 mg have also been used, though they provide fewer benefits.
To supplement grape seed extract, take 150 – 300 mg a day.
The standard dose for cocoa polyphenols is 1,000 mg. To get cocoa polyphenols through the diet, eat approximately 25 g of dark chocolate a day. This is not needed if you choose one of the other procyanidin options. Milk or white chocolate is not a source of polyphenols.

• Garlic

Why you should take it
Garlic is a food product and supplement known for its ability to boost the immune system and provide a variety of cardiovascular benefits.
Garlic can improve blood flow without affecting blood pressure because of its dietary sulfur content. Sulfur can improve hydrogen sulfide signaling, which leads to better circulation.
Garlic also supports nitric oxide (NO) signaling, which can improve the effects of procyanidins.
People with normal blood pressure will experience improved blood flow from eating garlic, while people with high blood pressure will also experience a reduction in blood pressure, in addition to the improved blood flow.
Garlic is also good for people with abnormal cholesterol levels. It can
reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL), which is sometimes called the “good” cholesterol. Garlic protects arteries from plaque buildup and calcification, preventing excess minerals from stiffening the blood vessels.
Garlic is a base supplement because of the variety of ways it can benefit the circulatory system. When used properly, it is safe and makes a good base for a heart health stack.

How to take it
Garlic can be eaten or supplemented. Both methods of ingestion will provide the same benefits. Supplementation is recommended for people that dislike the smell or taste of garlic. Supplementation of aged garlic extract will prevent the bad breath that comes from eating garlic cloves.
Garlic has blood thinning and antiplatelet effects. Garlic should be ingested cautiously if you are taking blood thinning medication like warfarin.
To maximize garlic’s benefits, eat three cloves a day, split between several meals. The cloves may be eaten raw or cooked, but they should not be boiled or otherwise heated before they are cut. Crushing garlic before heating will activate its bioactive compounds.
To supplement garlic, take 600 – 1,200 mg of aged garlic extract a day, split into several doses and taken with meals.

• Nitrate

Why you should take it
Nitrates are a dietary compound found in beets and leafy green vegetables. Due to restrictions surrounding sodium nitrate, a compound often added to meat, supplements containing effective doses of nitrates are not legal. Nitrates must be consumed through food products.
Nitrates break down into nitrites after they’re ingested, which circulate in the body and are turned into nitric oxide (NO) as needed. Elevated NO levels are associated with improved exercise performance, blood flow, and reduced blood pressure.
Nitrates are one of the major reasons that green vegetables are recommended for reducing the risk of hypertension and other circulatory disorders. Improved blood flow can even prevent cognitive decline, since blood flow to the brain is not impaired as people get older.

How to take it
The best way to supplement nitrates is by consuming leafy greens and beets. The standard dose for nitrates is between 6.4 – 12 .8 mg per kilogram of bodyweight. This corresponds to:

• 440 - 870 mg for a 150lb person
• 580 - 1,160 mg for a 200lb person
• 730 - 1,450 mg for a 250lb person

About 500 g (just over a pound) of fresh lettuce, rocket, swiss chard, crown daisy, spinach, kale, or beets a day will maximize nitrate’s benefits. Cooking does not appear to reduce the bioavailability of nitrates from beets. If you eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables, like spinach and kale, consider adding iodine to your diet by increasing your consumption of iodized table salt. These vegetables contain goitrogens, which are compounds that can disrupt the thyroid if consumed in high quantities, like the dose described above.

Honorable Mentions:
• CoQ10
• L-Carnitine
• Venotropics
• Fish Oil
• Vitamin K

Copes:
• Olive Leaf Extract
• Terminalia arjuna
• Stimulants



Insulin Sensitivity & Glucose Uptake

• Zinc

Why you should take it
Zinc is an important dietary mineral for general health.
People with insulin resistance can benefit from zinc supplementation, but only if they are deficient in zinc. Supplementation will reduce insulin and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in the body while improving insulin sensitivity. HbA1c is a biomarker for diabetes risk, which means high levels of HbA1c are correlated with diabetes, though HbA1c itself does not cause diabetes.
The most reliable way to determine if you have a zinc deficiency is by keeping track of what you eat on a weekly basis, then comparing the zinc contents in your food to the recommended daily allowance of zinc for your age and gender.
People with no insulin resistance and no zinc deficiency do not need to supplement zinc. Zinc is a base supplement only for insulin resistant people with diets low in zinc.

How to take it
To supplement zinc, take 25 – 30 mg of elemental zinc. Elemental zinc is the amount of zinc in the supplement you’re taking, excluding any compounds included to improve zinc absorption. For example, to take 30 mg of elemental zinc, take 230 mg of zinc gluconate. The label displays the elemental zinc content, not the total dosage.
Zinc should be taken with meals. Taking zinc on an empty stomach may cause nausea. Do not pair zinc with minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron
in combined doses of 800 mg or more. Combining them at low doses is fine, but in high amounts the minerals will compete for absorption and limit the overall effectiveness of supplementation.
If your diet is high in zinc, you do not need to supplement zinc. Foods like meat, fish, beans, nuts, seeds, and eggs are high in zinc.
Note: This dose is commonly recommended for athletic people who have high zinc losses in sweat. If you are either sedentary, don't produce a large amount of sweat, or have a diet moderate to high in meat products this dose could be dangerous for long-term daily usage. If that is the case, then reduce the daily dose to the range of 10-20 mg once daily.

• Myo-inositol

Why you should take it
Myo-inositol is a compound with a similar structure to glucose. It can improve insulin signaling because it is an ingredient in the reaction that creates phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3).
Myo-inositol deficiencies are associated with reduced PIP3 levels. Reduced PIP3 levels prevent insulin from signaling effectively. Supplementation of myo-inositol can benefit people suffering from type II diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), since it can improve insulin sensitivity.

How to take it
To supplement myo-inositol, assuming a powder supplement, take 4 g. To supplement with a soft gel formulation of myo-inositol, take 1,200 mg.
Myo-inositol should be taken with food, though more research is needed to confirm that this is the best way to take myo-inositol.
Pregnant women should not supplement myo-inositol. Myo-inositol supplementation can induce uterine contractions.

• Creatine

Why you should take it
Creatine is a source of fuel for muscle cells. Supplementing creatine will improve exercise performance and may benefit heart health. It also improves glucose uptake during muscle contractions, specifically during exercise.
Improved glucose uptake gives the muscles more energy to work with and staves off fatigue.
Creatine is a base supplement for glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity because it’s cheap, safe, and does not interact with pharmaceuticals. People with no insulin resistance will still benefit from creatine supplementation.

How to take it
The best way to supplement creatine is to take creatine monohydrate. Other forms of creatine may be more expensive, but studies have not found them to be more effective than creatine monohydrate.
If you are particularly sensitive to creatine’s digestive side-effects, which include nausea and cramping, consider supplementing micronized creatine, which may be gentler on the digestive system.
The daily dose for creatine is 5 g a day.
Loading creatine means taking a high dose of creatine for a short period of time before moving down to a smaller maintenance dose, which can be taken indefinitely. This is not necessary for effective supplementation. Though loading may result in benefits appearing slightly faster, results normalize after a few weeks.
Some people are creatine nonresponders, which means creatine is unable to pass from their blood to their muscles.
More research is needed to find a proven way to circumvent creatine nonresponse. Some evidence suggests it helps to take creatine with a meal high in both protein and carbohydrates, close to the time of actual muscle contraction. If you experience creatine nonresponse, consider taking creatine with a meal either before or after a workout.
If you respond to creatine, you don’t have to worry about timing supplementation, though you will probably want to take it with a meal to lower the risk of an upset stomach.

Honorable Mentions:
• Berberine
• Cinnamon

Copes:
• Isoleucine
• Corosolic Acid
• Salacia
• Chromium



Libido & Sexual Enhancement

• Maca

Why you should take it
Maca is a root vegetable that can enhance libido when supplemented by both men and women. It is one of the few supplements that has repeatedly been shown to improve libido in a dose and timing-dependent way. Maca supplementation can improve libido consistently when supplemented over the course of eight weeks, at which point libido plateaus and maintains its improved level.
Maca can be used to treat sexual dysfunction related to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a kind of antidepressant. It can also provide mild benefits for men with erectile dysfunction. Preliminary animal evidence suggests red maca can improve prostate health and reduce anxiety.
When it comes to improving libido, there is no difference between red, black, or yellow maca.
Maca does not interact with any major hormones, like testosterone, estrogen, and DHEA. It is not known to interact with any pharmaceuticals.

How to take it
To supplement maca, take 1,500 – 3,000 mg of maca root powder a day, with the first meal of the day.

Honorable Mentions:
• Yohimbine

Copes:
• Eurycoma Longifolia
• Fenugreek
• Tribulus terrestris
• Testosterone Boosters
• Sodium Bicarbonate
• ß-Hydroxy ß-Methylbutyrate (HMB)
• Glutamine




Liver Health

• Methylation agent

Why you should take it
Methylation agents are compounds that support levels of S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) in the liver. Low levels of SAMe are associated with non- alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
Though methylation agents do not provide a curative effect, they are thought to reduce the risk of accumulating liver fat in the presence of compounds that may harm the liver, such as alcohol.
Choline and trimethylglycine (TMG) are proven methylation agents and considered base supplements for liver health. SAMe itself can also be supplemented, but it is significantly more expensive than the options above. Creatine is another option, as it can preserve SAMe levels in the liver, though it has not been noted to offer any protective effects.

How to take it
To supplement choline, take 250 – 500 mg of choline bitartrate once a day, with a meal. If you eat more than four eggs (or yolks) a day, you do not need to supplement choline.
To supplement trimethylglycine (betaine), take 500 – 1,000 mg, once a day with a meal, as a minimum effective dose. Beets (250 - 500 g) and spinach (250 - 500 g) also contain trimethylglycine. Doses up to 2,500 - 6,000 mg may be more beneficial, but can only be acquired through the diet with the help of a lot of spinach.
To supplement creatine, take 2 g with a meal. Active people should supplement 5 g or more instead.
Some people are creatine nonresponders, which means creatine is unable to pass from their blood to their muscles.
More research is needed to find a proven way to circumvent creatine nonresponse. Some evidence suggests it helps to take creatine with a meal high in both protein and carbohydrates, close to the time of actual muscle contraction. If you experience creatine nonresponse, consider taking creatine with a meal either before or after a workout.
If you respond to creatine, you don’t have to worry about timing supplementation, though you will probably want to take it with a meal to lower the risk of an upset stomach.

• N-Acetylcysteine

Why you should take it
N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a compound used for producing glutathione. Low levels of glutathione are associated with various inflammatory and oxidative diseases. NAC supplementation will support glutathione levels and prevent any related health issues.
NAC supplementation is often used in cases of liver failure and toxin-induced liver damage, particularly paracetamol/acetaminophen overdoses. Low doses of NAC are a cheap and effective way to support liver antioxidants.

How to take it
To supplement NAC, take 750 – 1,000 mg, once a day, if you have no known or likely liver ailments. People with oxidative or inflammatory liver problems should supplement 5,000 mg a day, after talking to their doctor.
NAC does not need to be taken with a meal.

Honorable Mentions:
• Milk Thistle
• Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid (TUDCA)

Copes:
• Spirulina
• Picrorhiza kurroa



Memory & Focus

• Blueberry

Why you should take it
Blueberries and other dark berries contain molecules called anthocyanins and pterostilbenes. These compounds can protect the brain and influence its activity.
Blueberries can also increase the activity of a growth factor called neuronal growth factor (NGF). When neurons grow, they branch out toward each other. NGF helps neurons grow, which makes it easier for them to communicate.
Though the only human evidence for blueberries increasing cognition comes from studies done on senior citizens, the mechanism and animal evidence suggest blueberries are an effective supplement for brain health.
Blueberries are safe, readily available, and do not interact negatively with pharmaceuticals. Blueberries are an ideal base supplement for the Memory & Focus stack.

How to take it
To supplement blueberries, take 500 – 1,000 mg of blueberry anthocyanins, once a day.
This is equivalent to 60 – 120 g of fresh berries, less than one metric cup.
To supplement blueberries through a supplement that is not concentrated for anthocyanin content, take 5.5 – 11 g of the supplement.
Studies on blueberry juice use a 500 mL daily dose.
Note: Blueberry juice should include blueberries or a similar dark berry as the first ingredient. Any juice made primarily from sugars with added flavoring will not benefit memory or focus after ingestion.

Honorable Mentions:
• Bacopa monnieri
• L-Theanine with Caffeine
• Nicotine Gum

Copes:
• Creatine
• Cholinergics
• Uridine




Mood & Depression

• Zinc

Why you should take it
Zinc is an important mineral for general health, and it may influence mood and depression.
Though zinc lacks a potent antidepressant effect, supplementation is known to increase the effectiveness of other antidepressant therapies, and improve the mood of people that are not suffering from clinical depression.
High doses of zinc are potentially dangerous and should be avoided, but the standard dose will improve mood while also working with other antidepressant agents to increase their effects.
Some dietary minerals, like chromium, also have antidepressant properties. It’s recommended to focus on zinc supplementation first, since fixing a zinc deficiency will safely provide a variety of beneficial health effects.
Zinc can cause a copper deficiency over time, since it kickstarts the process
of creating a protein called metallothionein, which binds to excess zinc while depleting copper. The extra zinc leaves the body as a waste product. This can happen after zinc superloading, but the doses below are too low to pose this risk.

How to take it
Zinc should be supplemented in the range of 25 - 30 mg of elemental zinc per day. Elemental zinc refers to the weight of zinc itself, and excludes the weight of the compound it is supplemented with to help absorption. For example, consuming 230 mg of zinc gluconate means consuming 30 mg of elemental zinc. The label displays the elemental dosage, not the total dosage.
Zinc should be taken with meals, since some people may experience nausea after supplementing zinc on an empty stomach. Do not pair zinc with minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron in combined doses of 800 mg or more. Combining them at low doses is fine, but in high amounts the minerals will compete for absorption and limit the overall effectiveness of supplementation.
Note: This dose is commonly recommended for athletic people who have high zinc losses in sweat. If you are either sedentary, don't produce a large amount of sweat, or have a diet moderate to high in meat products this dose could be dangerous for long-term daily usage. If that is the case, then reduce the daily dose to the range of 10-20 mg once daily.

• S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe)

Why you should take it
S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is a compound that works with enzymes in the body in a process called methylation. Sometimes, a molecule needs a ‘methyl’ group to undergo a chemical reaction. SAMe provides that group and allows the reaction to proceed. Many of these reactions are involved in depression.
SAMe has been found to have a potency similar to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and it can also increase the benefits seen with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy. This increase in benefit seen with SSRIs is normally considered a beneficial interaction, although a high enough dose of both supplements could cause a negative reaction. If you take antidepressants, consult with a medical professional before supplementing SAMe.
Both trimethylglycine (betaine) and creatine monohydrate have been found to increase SAMe levels indirectly after supplementation. Preliminary evidence suggests creatine may have the same antidepressant effects SAMe does. If SAMe is too expensive, creatine and trimethylglycine are worth looking into instead.
Creatine and trimethylglycine do not have negative interactions with serotonin-based medications.
SAMe is recommended as a base supplement (despite the potential SSRI interaction) because it is effective and can be replaced by alternate supplements by people taking antidepressants.

How to take it
The standard SAMe dose is 400 mg, taken three times a day for a total daily dose of 1,200 mg. It may take up to two weeks for SAMe supplementation to have significant effects on the body. SAMe should be taken with meals, and its usage alongside pharmaceuticals should be initially cleared by a medical practitioner.
To mimic SAMe’s effects with creatine, take 2 - 5 g once a day, with a meal. This is the standard supplemental creatine dose.

Honorable Mentions:
• Fish Oil
• St. John’s Wort
• Adaptogens

Copes:
• Vitamin D
• N-Acetylcysteine
• N-Acetylcysteine
• Nigella sativa
• Uridine




Muscle Gain & Exercise Performance

• Creatine

Why you should take it
Creatine is a source of ATP, a source of energy for your cells. Supplementing creatine monohydrate increases the body’s creatine stores, which are located primarily in the muscles. Creatine improves the ability of muscle cells to react to intense stressors (such as lifting weights).
Creatine has a lot of strong evidence for both its safety and its ability to improve muscular power output. It also increases anaerobic endurance by acting as fuel for your cells. Muscle cells will use creatine for energy before burning glucose, which helps your muscles perform under pressure and knock out those last few reps.
Creatine supplementation will cause a slight water weight gain in the
first few weeks of supplementation, but creatine’s ability to improve performance will cancel out the temporary disadvantages of increased water weight. After prolonged creatine supplementation, the water weight will be replaced with muscle.
Creatine is safe and cheap. Its only potential side-effects are nausea, cramping, and diarrhea from too large a dose. The benefits it provides for muscle growth and general physical performance make it standard in any performance enhancing supplement stack.

How to take it
The best way to supplement creatine is to take creatine monohydrate. Other forms of creatine may be more expensive, but studies have not found them to be more effective than creatine monohydrate.
If you are particularly sensitive to creatine’s digestive side-effects, which include nausea and cramping, consider supplementing micronized creatine, which may be gentler on the digestive system. Creatine should be consumed with water.
The standard daily dose for creatine is 5 g a day. This is enough to improve power output. People with more muscle mass may benefit from a higher daily dose, as much as 10 g, but this claim is not fully supported by the evidence. To supplement 10 g, split it into two doses of 5 g, taken twice a day.
Loading creatine means taking a high dose of creatine for a short period of time before moving down to a smaller maintenance dose, which can be taken indefinitely. This is not necessary for effective supplementation. Though loading may result in benefits appearing slightly faster, results normalize after a few weeks.
Some people are creatine nonresponders, which means creatine is unable to pass from their blood to their muscles.
More research is needed to find a proven way to circumvent creatine nonresponse. Some evidence suggests it helps to take creatine with a meal high in both protein and carbohydrates, close to the time of actual muscle contraction. If you experience creatine nonresponse, consider taking creatine with a meal either before or after a workout.
If you respond to creatine, you don’t have to worry about timing supplementation, though you will probably want to take it with a meal to lower the risk of an upset stomach.

• Nitrates

Why you should take it
Nitrates are a compound found in leafy green vegetables and beetroot. Nitrates break down into nitrites, which circulate in the body and are turned into nitric oxide (NO) as needed. Elevated NO levels during exercise provide a variety of benefits.
Nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve anaerobic and aerobic endurance, blood flow, and work output, resulting in increased muscle recovery between bouts of exercise. Nitrates improve the body’s ability
to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the food you eat. ATP is responsible for the energy transfer that powers your muscles. High levels of circulating nitrite help the mitochondria in cells produce ATP more efficiently.
Unfortunately, selling a nitrate supplement with a dose high enough to cause these effects is not legal. This is due to the regulation surrounding sodium nitrate, a food additive frequently added to meat products.
Instead, nitrate supplementation should take place in the form of a pre-workout meal incorporating leafy greens or beetroot. Beetroot extract supplements will not provide enough nitrates to affect exercise performance.
How to take it
Nitrates are best supplemented through food products like leafy greens or beets, 60 – 120 minutes before exercise. Consuming these foods in a liquid form, such as through a shake, juice, or puree, will increase the rate of nitrate absorption, since solid food particles take longer to digest. The optimal nitrate dose is in the range of 6.4 - 12.8 mg per kilogram of bodyweight. This corresponds to approximately:
• 440 - 870 mg for a 150 lb person
• 580 - 1,160 mg for a 200 lb person • 730 - 1,450 mg for a 250 lb person
Consuming 500 g (a little over a pound) of beets, radishes, or any leafy green vegetable, including lettuce, rocket, spinach, crown daisy, and swiss chard will provide enough nitrates for you to enjoy the benefits during your next workout. People taking the blood thinner warfarin should consult with their doctor before consuming high levels of some leafy greens, due to the vitamin K content.
Take care to avoid spitting frequently during your workout, since saliva is a necessary intermediary step in activating dietary nitrate. Mouthwash should also be avoided.

• Protein

Why you should take it
Dietary protein is a term used to refer to any food or supplemental source of protein. Protein is important for muscle growth and exercise due to the mass of amino acids required to build muscle, and also due to the activity of specific amino acids like leucine which can act to promote muscle protein synthesis.
For maximal improvements in muscle growth and exercise performance, consume a sufficient amount of protein each day from food. If your food intake does not cover your protein needs, then supplemental protein such as whey or casein protein can be used.

How to take it
Dietary protein for muscle gain and improving exercise performance is not dependent on when you eat protein; the major factor at play is how much protein you consume over the course of a day. Click here to figure out how much protein you need every day, and ideally protein would be spread into at least a few meals a day for ease of digestion.
The only time protein timing appears to be relevant is if working out fasted (such as exercising in the morning). In such a situation, it is advised to have some protein before you exercise. All other times see no major benefit with dietary protein timing.

Honorable Mentions:
• Beta Alanine
• Caffeine

Copes:
• Nitric Oxide Boosters
• Adaptogens
• Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs)
• Cholinergics
• Testosterone Boosters
• Sodium Bicarbonate
• ß-Hydroxy ß-Methylbutyrate (HMB)
• Glutamine




Skin & Hair Quality

• Vitamin A

Why you should take it
Vitamin A increases collagen levels in the body. Collagen is the main structural protein in connective tissue. Applying vitamin A to the skin can increase collagen synthesis while preventing collagen degradation.
Vitamin A supplementation can also reduce skin lipid content, which is why a synthetic compound similar to vitamin A, called Accutane, is used to treat acne. Accutane’s major side effect is skin dryness and peeling.
Applying vitamin A nightly can reduce the appearance of age-related wrinkles by increasing the skin thickness. Continued usage of vitamin A can also lighten abnormal skin pigmentation, like sun spots. When applied to the face, vitamin A can make the skin smoother.
Vitamin A may not provide benefits for wrinkles caused by sun exposure.
People that get prolonged daily sun exposure should not apply vitamin A topically. High doses of oral vitamin A have been linked to birth defects. Though topical vitamin A application has not been linked to birth defects, pregnant women and women planning families should be careful with excessive topical application of vitamin A.

How to take it
To supplement vitamin A, apply all-trans retinoic acid, also known as tretinoin, to the skin through a cream containing between 0.025 – 0.1% of the molecule. Higher doses are more effective, but also more likely to cause dryness and mild skin peeling.

Honorable Mentions:
• Polypodium leucotomos
• Coconut Oil

Copes:
• Creatine
• Vitamin K
• Zinc
• Vitamin E
• Biotin



Sleep Quality

• Magnesium

Why you should take it
Magnesium is an important dietary mineral, and deficiencies are associated with impaired sleep quality. Magnesium deficiencies are more common in athletes because magnesium is lost through sweat.
Supplementation of magnesium can improve sleep quality, but it is most effective for sleep deprived people who also have low dietary magnesium intake. People with healthy magnesium levels may not experience benefits to sleep quality after supplementation.
Even though magnesium can help improve sleep quality in people who have low magnesium levels, it does not have a sedative effect. Therefore, you don't need to worry about getting sleepy after taking a magnesium supplement.

How to take it
Magnesium is not a time-dependent supplement, and does not need to be taken immediately before bed. The standard dose for magnesium is 200
mg of elemental magnesium, though doses of up to 400 mg can be used. Elemental magnesium content is found on the supplement label. It is the amount of magnesium in the supplement, excluding other compounds that may be included.
Magnesium can be supplemented through magnesium citrate, magnesium malate, magnesium diglycinate, and magnesium gluconate. Magnesium oxide is not recommended for supplementation because it is more likely to cause intestinal discomfort and diarrhea, and is known to have less absorption than other forms.
Magnesium gluconate should be taken with a meal to increase the absorption of the supplement, but other forms of magnesium can be taken either with food or on an empty stomach. Some antibiotics such as the quinolone class (ie. ciprofloxacin) and tetracyclines should not be taken alongside magnesium.

Honorable Mentions:
• Melatonin
• Lavender

Copes:
• Glycine
• Valerian
• Lemon Balm
• Caffeine




Testosterone Boosting & Enhancement

• Zinc

Why you should take it
Zinc is a dietary mineral that is often promoted for boosting testosterone. It's true that taking a zinc supplement can increase testosterone levels, but only in people who have a zinc deficiency. Athletes are more prone to zinc deficiency than the general population because zinc can be lost through sweat.
Zinc deficiencies are associated with lower testosterone levels, so if supplementation brings zinc levels back to normal, testosterone levels will rise with it. It is important to note that increasing zinc levels above normal body levels will not increase testosterone any further. High doses of zinc can irritate the gastrointestinal tract and cause liver and kidney damage. Over time, high doses of zinc can result in a copper deficiency.

How to take it
Zinc should be supplemented in the range of 25 - 30 mg of elemental zinc per day. Elemental zinc refers to the weight of zinc itself, and excludes the weight of the compound it is supplemented with to help absorption. For example, consuming 230 mg of zinc gluconate means consuming 30 mg of elemental zinc. The label displays the elemental dosage, not the total dosage.
Zinc should be taken with meals, since some people may experience nausea after supplementing zinc on an empty stomach. Do not pair zinc with minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron in combined doses of 800 mg or more. Combining them at low doses is fine, but in high amounts the minerals will compete for absorption and limit the overall effectiveness of supplementation.
Note: This dose is commonly recommended for athletic people who have high zinc losses in sweat. If you are either sedentary, don't produce a large amount of sweat, or have a diet moderate to high in meat products this dose could be dangerous for long-term daily usage. If that is the case, then reduce the daily dose to the range of 10-20 mg once daily.

• Magnesium

Why you should take it
Magnesium is a dietary mineral, like zinc. Magnesium deficiencies are associated with lowered testosterone levels.
Supplementing magnesium when deficient in magnesium will restore testosterone levels to normal. People without a magnesium deficiency should not supplement magnesium, as it will not raise testosterone levels above normal.
Like zinc, magnesium is lost through sweat, so it is often recommended for athletes.

How to take it
The standard dose for magnesium is 200 mg of elemental magnesium, though doses of up to 400 mg can be used. Elemental magnesium content is found on the supplement label. It is the amount of magnesium in the supplement, excluding other compounds that may be included.
Magnesium can be supplemented through magnesium citrate, magnesium diglycinate, and magnesium gluconate. Magnesium oxide is not recommended for supplementation because it is poorly absorbed and is more likely to cause intestinal discomfort and diarrhea.
Magnesium gluconate should be taken with a meal to increase the absorption of the supplement, but other forms of magnesium can be taken either with food or on an empty stomach.

• Vitamin D

Why you should take it
Vitamin D has often been researched in the context of male fertility. In fact, vitamin D receptors are located on sperm cells. Vitamin D may also play a role in the production of steroid hormones.
Studies have shown that for men with low vitamin D levels, supplementing vitamin D over the course of a year resulted in an increase in testosterone levels. It is not known if this is due to fixing low testosterone or due to an inherent increase in testosterone, as the study was conducted in middle-aged men who may have experienced an age-related testosterone decline.
Vitamin D is a base supplement because it is very safe, cheap, and guards against low testosterone levels. Most people do not get enough vitamin D. People living near the equator that get a lot of sun may not need to supplement vitamin D. Vitamin D should be supplemented throughout winter, since sun exposure is less frequent during cold seasons.
Note: People with darker skin tones will require more sun exposure than lighter skinned people to get the same amount of vitamin D.

How to take it
To supplement vitamin D, take between 2,000 – 3,000 IU a day. The lower end of the range our usual recommended dose, while the higher end is similar to the dosages used in studies on vitamin D and testosterone.
Vitamin D should be taken with meals containing dietary fat. It is sometimes taken in the morning due to anecdotal reports that it may impair sleep quality if taken too close to bedtime.

• Creatine

Why you should take it
Creatine is a small organic acid which serves as an energy intermediate, replenishing ATP levels in a cell faster than glucose or fatty acids. It is most well known for its ability to increase the rate of muscle growth and improvements in strength during training.
Creatine has been investigated for its interactions with androgens a few times, and in young men (18-35 age bracket) it appears to cause a mild but reliable increase in testosterone concentrations by around 20-25%. This increase in testosterone is thought to be partially responsible for the effects of creatine on muscle growth and power output.
Creatine is safe, but further research is needed to determine the mechanism through which it increases testosterone levels. More studies are needed to research creatine's effect on testosterone when supplemented by women. An increase in dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was observed in one study, but this has not been replicated.

How to take it
The best way to supplement creatine is to take creatine monohydrate. Other forms of creatine may be more expensive, but studies have not found them to be more effective than creatine monohydrate.
If you are particularly sensitive to creatine’s digestive side-effects, which include nausea and cramping, consider supplementing micronized creatine, which may be gentler on the digestive system.
The standard daily dose for creatine is 5 g a day. This is enough to improve power output. People with more muscle mass may benefit from a higher daily dose, as much as 10 g, but this claim is not fully supported by the evidence. To supplement 10 g, split it into two doses of 5 g during the day.
Loading creatine means taking a high dose of creatine for a short period of time before moving down to a smaller maintenance dose, which can be taken indefinitely. This is not necessary for effective supplementation. Though loading may result in benefits appearing slightly faster, results normalize after a few weeks.
Some people are creatine non-responders, which means creatine is unable to pass from their blood to their muscles.
More research is needed to find a proven way to circumvent creatine nonresponse. Some evidence suggests it helps to take creatine with a meal high in both protein and carbohydrates, close to the time of actual muscle contraction. If you experience creatine nonresponse, consider taking creatine with a meal either before or after a workout.
If you respond to creatine, you don’t have to worry about timing supplementation, though you will probably want to take it with a meal to lower the risk of an upset stomach.

Honorable Mentions:
• DHEA

Copes:
• D-Aspartic Acid
• Boron
• Coleus Forskohlii
• Libido Enhancers
 
JustBeCurry

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good thread you should post sources
 
copingvolcel

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Apart from maca, everything here is completely useless. You don't need supplements, you just need a good diet and a good training program that you stick to.
 
whatamIdoinwithmylyf

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

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Apart from maca, everything here is completely useless. You don't need supplements, you just need a good diet and a good training program that you stick to.
Most of the Incels are deficient in many things
 
Baldingman1998

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Apart from maca, everything here is completely useless. You don't need supplements, you just need a good diet and a good training program that you stick to.
Many people are deficient and need suppliments. Especially incels that rot home all day and avoid sun 24/7
 
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Cope

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Spirulina is god tier for allergies tbh, mogs even pharmaceuticals.
 
looksmaxillas

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Do u recommend supplementing ALL of these srs?
 
whatamIdoinwithmylyf

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

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Do u recommend supplementing ALL of these srs?
No, You have to make your own stack depending on your goals or deficiencies.
Always remember its 100 times better to over dose nutrients than to be even -1% deficient in them even for 1 day.
 
MewingJBP

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good information but supps will only give minimal benefits
 
whatamIdoinwithmylyf

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

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good information but supps will only give minimal benefits
taking supps is not about their benefit, its about discipline and placebo effect for self improvement,

only overdosing certain supps for certain reasons give noticeable benefits, that too has to be consistent for months in order to work,

jfl at thinking taking little tablets for even a year everyday will change you in some way
 
whatamIdoinwithmylyf

whatamIdoinwithmylyf

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